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July 18, 2011 |

Singing helps when learn languages!

One of the best language tips I can think of would be to sing to music in your target language. The number one area on which this works is pronunciation, which I like getting down to a science before starting to learn too many words if at all possible. It takes a lot of the average person's stress out of learning a language, being able to look at at least 75% of words and say "I know how to say that aloud."

I've also noticed that singing a song in another language can have a slightly different system from the way the language is usually spoken (I'm looking at you, Japanese!). For instance, sentences or words are often pronounced a certain way in a song to sound more melodic or gentler. This makes it easy to recognize individual sounds since they're often exaggerated, and when you study sung language as opposed to just conversational language, the way words are sung can make you more familiar with different phonemes. This process has indoctrinated me the pronunciation of Dutch, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish. Sometimes you'll be pleasantly surprised; for instance, Japanese and Spanish have remarkably similar pronunciation on the vast majority of words, but you wouldn't expect that from a Latin vs. an Asian (more specifically Japonic) language!




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