Fløyen and Fløibanen

Back in Norway! One of the first things I did since arriving (after recuperating from the long flight for a bit) is climb Fløyen, a 320-meter high mountain that overlooks Bergen and gives a view like no other at the top:

There’s an option to, instead of climbing the whole way up Fløyen, ride Fløibanen, a kind of railcar that brings you to the summit instead. Fløibanen is one of Bergen’s most well-known tourist attractions, but Sindre and I were in the mood to walk to the top; I was eager to get my body re-used to the elevation that greets you as soon as you step out of the airport in Norway, and what better way to get the leg muscles stretching and growing again than topping one of Bergen’s best-known mountains?

There’s a souvenir shop at the top (where I got a Norwegian flag belt because I couldn’t find a reason not to). I was surprised to find out they served me free water, which is quite unusual for Norway. They stock all kinds of books about Bergen and Norway in other languages (including Dutch!), something that greatly interested me, of course. The books were a bit bulky and had too many pictures, though, so I didn’t get one. Great stuff nonetheless.

Oh yeah. And I tried on this hat both times I’ve been in Norway (no, I didn’t end up getting it :P).

Here’s how I knew I was back in Norway for sure: seeing tons of taco supplies and Pepsi Max at the REMA 1000 grocery store! (Oddly enough, tacos with Pepsi Max is a fairly popular meal here!)

I also learned an important lesson today. You can’t half-ass anything if you mean to sure as hell enjoy it. Anything you want to do – in order to truly, really enjoy it – you must give it your all. You can never do something at your best when you’re holding yourself back so much just in case it doesn’t work out. You have to thrust yourself into this life, and give it your all, no matter what it is: a project, a learning experience, a friendship. It could be all three. You simply must give your all and use all you’ve got; if you’re ever going to experience anything wholly, there can be no strings attached.

Tomorrow’s May 17th, Norway’s national day (Nasjonaldagen). I hear it’s supposed to be nuts! There are also a lot of parades and people dressed up from what I’ve heard, but I’ll be witnessing all of it firsthand tomorrow, so I’ll report back about what happens!